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Posts Tagged ‘United States’

It’s been far too long since the last post – but we’ve been blessedly busy with lots of custom 18th century clothing orders, so we won’t complain too much! ūüôā¬† On to the post…

Photo credit: The Morris Tribe blog - check it out by clicking the picture!

 

September is  International Homesteading Education Month, but event announcements are already starting to pop up!  There will be events taking place all over the United States.  If you live here in the Ohio area, you can check out the Homesteading Fair at the Crooked Barn Farm in Wooster.  Seven Springs, PA has a Homesteading Day and a three-day fair focused on homesteading.  Lucky residents near the Oakland, CA area have the Institute of Urban Homesteading at their disposal that has tons of educational events planned on everything from canning to hot and cold process soap making.  Beatrice, NE hosts events at the Homestead National Monument of America that includes gathering prairie seeds with Park Rangers, poetry writing influenced by the surroundings for high school students, a US Immigration Naturalization Ceremony, a Homesteader Reunion Weekend, Living History event and more!  You can learn more about International Homesteading Education Month and keep up-to-date on new postings at Mother Earth News here.

What a neat country we live in, and what a wealth of information you can gather from those living the “simple life” – as many of our ancestors pushing¬†out¬†West¬†into¬†the areas Pennsylvania, Kentucky and Ohio,¬†would have been doing in the 18th century.¬†

Will you be attending an event this September Рor is there a homesteading event you know of going on now?

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The Monticello Garden Project

We’ve decided to (try) to grow a¬†historically based “Colonial”¬†garden this year!¬†¬† We’re using seeds purchased from Monticello that were all documented¬†by the¬†flora enthusiast Thomas Jefferson¬†and planted at his home garden in Virginia.¬† Although we may have a range¬†of successes throughout the project – we’ll try to blog¬†about the whole experience and see if we might be able to learn some things along¬†the way!¬† We’ll look into the history of the various seeds we’ll be using, notes directly from Mr. Jefferson on the plants we’ll be growing, and showcase some 18th century recipes using some of the ingredients we’re hoping to grow.

Our inspiration:

South view of some of the gardens at Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello.

Of course, ours will be on a microscopic scale compared to the vast gardens at Monticello seen above¬†– but it’s a start!

I thought the introduction of our Monticello Garden Project would be a great tie-in to a neat article from Mother Earth News about creating a self-sufficient homestead Рin as little as 1-acre of land!  

Here is a suggested plan for one way to lay out all the areas needed for a self-sufficient homestead.

The article mentions: “Your 1-acre homestead can be divided into land for raising livestock and a garden for raising fruits, vegetables, plus some grain and forage crops.”¬†

You can read the full article at Mother Earth News here, which is actually an excerpt from the book “The self-sufficient Life and How to Live It” by John Seymour.¬† The book looks fascinating and, according to the synopsis, “…teaches all the skills needed to live independently: harnessing natural forms of energy, raising crops and keeping livestock, preserving foodstuffs, making beer and wine, basketry, carpentry, weaving, and much more.”

While we don’t have the time nor space to go as far as creating a full-on self-sufficient homestead – we’re hoping this historical garden will be a starting block to bring us back to natural eating, living off the land and becoming a bit more independent and controlled in what we bring into our kitchen.¬† Plus, the best part – we’ll learn all sorts of interesting things throughout this new adventure!

We’re excited to get started!¬† Do you plan on growing a garden this year or do you participate in some form of self-sufficient homesteading?

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